Pres. Maria Horton @ 828 778 0279 |:| RENTALS call Sarah @ 828 545 9092 springmtncc@gmail.com

NEWS – NC COOPERATIVE EXTENSION

Here’s a link to the information below.

NEWS - NC COOPERATIVE EXTENSION
SEPTEMBER 2019
BUNCOMBE COUNTY CENTER
WHAT’S IN THIS ISSUE
          • Incredible Education Programs
          • September Garden Chores
          • Harvesting and Drying Gourds
          • Cover Crops and Green Manures
          • Evaluate the Summer Garden
          • Firewise Landscaping
          • Check Your Pressure Gauge
          • Find Extension Master Gardeners at:
              • Mountain State Fair
              • WNC Farmers Market Compost Demo
              • Asheville City Tailgates
NEWS - NC COOPERATIVE EXTENSION
Demo Day at the Learning Garden
 
“HARVEST TIME”
 
Wednesday September 11
9:00 am – 11:00 pm
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Presenter: 

The Learning Garden Team of Extension Master Gardener volunteers

NEWS - NC COOPERATIVE EXTENSION
NEWS - NC COOPERATIVE EXTENSION
NEWS - NC COOPERATIVE EXTENSION
 It is time to harvest late summer vegetables and herbs and to enjoy the last of summer flowers. While many perennials are finishing for the year, others are coming into their own. Come get ideas from our FourSeason garden on extending the season in your garden. Start your fall garden clean-up and visit our Compost Demonstration site to learn how to recycle your garden. And don’t forget to move tender houseplants back into the house.
The day begins at 9 a.m. with a brief orientation after which you can visit the different garden sites and talk with Master Gardeners in those gardens.
The talk is free but registration is requested by calling 828-255-5522.
 
Location:  NC Cooperative Extension, Buncombe County Center 49 Mount Carmel Rd Asheville, NC
NEWS - NC COOPERATIVE EXTENSION
Gardening In The Mountains 
“POLLINATOR GARDENS”
Thursday September 19th
10:00 am – 12:00 pm
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Presenter: 

Bryan Tompkins, Wildlife Biologist, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Asheville.

Bryan is the USFWS Southeast Region recovery biologist for the federally endangered rusty-patch bumble bee. We all have heard of the plight of North Carolina’s native pollinators. Loss of habitat, disease, climate change, and non-native species are all issues affecting the health and diversity of our native pollinators in the state.

Join us for a discussion of the incredible diversity of North Carolina’s pollinators and their habitats. Learn about the efforts that are being implemented statewide to save these extremely valuable and fascinating creatures.

The talk is free, but seating is limited, so registration is required by calling 828-255-5522.
Location:  NC Cooperative Extension, Buncombe County Center 49 Mount Carmel Rd Asheville, NC
NEWS - NC COOPERATIVE EXTENSION
Saturday Seminar
 
“CAN YOU IDENTIFY THE COMMON INVASIVE PLANTS OF WNC?”
Saturday September 28
10:00 am – 12:00 pm
dendro.cnre.vt.edu
NEWS - NC COOPERATIVE EXTENSION
NEWS - NC COOPERATIVE EXTENSION
Presenter: 

Barb Harrison

Extension Master Gardener Volunteer
Non-native invasive plants introduced into North Carolina are causing problems for our native
plant and animal species. These plants are taking over our natural areas, parks, forests, urban
environments, yards, and gardens. This seminar will teach you how to recognize and identify
the most common invasive plants in our area and how to reduce their spread.
We’ll have samples of these invasive plants on hand for you to test your knowledge and see
how many you can correctly identify.
The talk is free but registration is requested by calling 828-255-5522.
Location:  Buncombe County Extension Center 49 Mt Carmel Rd, Asheville, NC 28806
NEWS - NC COOPERATIVE EXTENSION
The Sowing Circle Presents: 
“HANDS-ON COMPOSTING WORKSHOP”
NEWS - NC COOPERATIVE EXTENSION
NEWS - NC COOPERATIVE EXTENSION
Join long-time composter and Master Gardener Intern, John Bowen, for a hands-on composting workshop. Participants will learn about cold- and hot-composting, ratios of green to brown, what can and cannot be composted, how to build a proper compost pile, trouble-shooting composting problems and so much more.  This workshop will get you energized to start your own composting system at home.
The workshop will be held, rain or shine, on Sept. 7 at 10 am at Dr. John Wilson Community Garden, 99 White Pine Drive in Black Mountain.
Please bring a hat, camping chair, and water.
This hour long presentation is free and sponsored by Black Mountain Blooms Seed Lending Library and Buncombe County Extension Master Garden Volunteers.
RSVP NOT REQUIRED – For any questions, contact Black Mountain Library 828-250-4756
NEWS - NC COOPERATIVE EXTENSION
SEPTEMBER GARDEN CHORES
Ornamentals 
* Now is NOT the time to fertilize perennials and woody plants. Late-season nitrogen can reduce cold hardiness and force growth that can be damaged by hard frosts.
* This is a good time to cut flowers for drying. Good candidates for air-drying include celosia, yarrow, statice, globe amaranth, strawflowers, goldenrod and grasses.
* Leaving some of the few remaining seed heads of coneflower, sunflower and black eyed susan can be good for the birds to enjoy in the months ahead.
* Move houseplants indoors before temperatures drop below 45 F. Check for signs of insects and treat. Rinse off foliage, remove dead leaves and cut back long stems.
* Now is time to divide peonies that have not flowered well. Leave several “eyes” on each division and be sure to replant them with the eyes no more than 2 inches below the soil surface. Keep them watered this fall.
* Check evergreens for bagworms. Removing them now prevents re-infestation next spring.
* Pull spent summer annuals and replace them with pansies or ornamental kale or cabbage.
Fruits
* To reduce the reoccurrence of fruit rot in peaches and grapes next year remove all plant debris including mummified fruit left hanging on the plant and lying on the ground.
* Remove weeds and fertilize in strawberry beds where plants are forming next spring’s flower buds. Also water if September rains are lacking.
* Prune blackberries and raspberries and remove the old fruit-bearing canes from this year. Also thin new canes to leave only 4-8 canes per square yard.
Vegetables 
* Remove spent vegetable plants as soon as possible to reduce carry-over of insect and disease problems. Consider keeping a separate compost pile for diseased plants and do not use that compost in the vegetable garden. .
* Plant fall vegetables by mid-month. Sow lettuce seeds every couple of weeks for a continual harvest. Cilantro and dill can also be sown during cooler weather.
* Insects can be a problem with all of the cabbage family crops. Use row cover or a weekly application of B.t. bacteria spray to prevent cabbageworms. Use insecticidal soap for aphids if needed.
* Consider planting a cover crop on vegetable beds to build organic matter for next year’s garden. Mark your calendar to mow and turn under in February or March before the next growing season.
NOW IS THE TIME TO ORDER GARLIC!
Plant in October – November
NEWS - NC COOPERATIVE EXTENSION
STOP WATERING YOUR AMARYLLIS
NEWS - NC COOPERATIVE EXTENSION
If you have an amaryllis in a pot that you want to bloom again.. NOW is the time to stop watering and let it go dormant!
Amaryllis need a period of rest before it will flower and grow again.
As you withhold water, the leaves will yellow and die back. When this begins to happen, move the plant to a cool (50 to 55 degrees) dark location for
8 to 10 weeks.
Once the dormancy period has been met, the growth cycle can start again. At this time repot the bulb with fresh soil and move the pot to a warm sunny location. Begin watering again but withhold fertilize until growth begins.

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HARVESTING AND DRYING GOURDS
Turks turbin, Martin house and Luffa are a few names among the different groups of gourds that are grown for both ornamental and functional purposes.
Cucurbita gourds are often decorative and have names that describe their shape like Egg, Crown of Thorns or Turks Turbin. These can be injured by frost and freezing temperatures and are best harvested when mature but before cold weather arrives. These gourds should be kept cool and dry to cure which can take weeks and even months.
Lagenaria gourds are the functional class and have names like Dipper, Bottle, Birdhouse. These can tolerate light frost, can remain in the garden longer and need to handled carefully to avoid damage to the skin.
Luffa gourds are luffa gourds and can be harvested whenever they turn brown.
When harvesting gourds, cut them from the vine leaving a small section of the stem attached to the gourd.

NEWS - NC COOPERATIVE EXTENSION

CLICK HERE to read more.

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NEWS - NC COOPERATIVE EXTENSION
SEASON FOR SEEDING LAWNS 
NEWS - NC COOPERATIVE EXTENSION
August 15 – September 15 is the window for renovating or over seeding the lawn.
While lawns may be the best choice for areas that get heavy foot traffic, they can take valuable resources to maintain and impact the environment.
If you have areas of lawn in the landscape that are less utilized consider tolerating more weeds, converting more to garden space or planting groundcovers or other bee friendly plants.
To help the remaining areas of lawn to thrive, reduce weed invasions and other pest problems follow the basic steps for cool season lawn care here in the mountains.
 CLICK HERE for in-depth information on lawns
To view the Fescue Lawn Maintenance Calendar GO HERE
Click Here to find Master Gardeners
 ….. at a tailgate near you.
 
Ask Questions!           Pick up Soil Kits!
TIME TO PLANT COVER CROPS …
We are in a good window for planting a winter cover or green manure crop. These crops are important soil management tools and help to add organic matter, improve fertility and soil structure, reduce erosion, suppress winter weeds and loosen compacted soils.
GREAT FOR NEW GARDEN SPACES!
Austrian winter peas, Barley, Crimson Clover, Rye, Ryegrass, Triticale, Hairy Vetch and Wheat work well alone or in combination.
CLICK HERE for more information.
NEWS - NC COOPERATIVE EXTENSION
EVALUATE THE SUMMER 
VEGETABLE GARDEN NOW!
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Kathleen Moore CC BY - 2.0
Kathleen Moore  CC BY – 2.0
This is THE BEST time to make notes about your vegetable garden!
Ask yourself the following questions to help get you started.
  • What variety vegetable did you grow?
  • Did you actually eat the vegetable and like the flavor?
  • Were you able to manage the plant? on a trellis? with stakes?
  • Did you give the plant enough space to grow?
  • What insects and diseases were most prominent?
  • Did you learn to I.D. the insects and diseases and how tomanage them?
  • Did the soil drain well? What type of problems came from too much rain?
  • Was the garden overwhelmed by weeds? what kind of mulch did you use?
What else would help you grow a better, more beautiful, more abundant garden next year?
NEWS - NC COOPERATIVE EXTENSION
BE FIREWISE!

NEWS - NC COOPERATIVE EXTENSION

Making plans now to prevent or reduce the damage caused by wildland fires is ALWAYS a good idea for the many who live in a home or community surrounded by forests.
CLICK HERE  to read a recent blog post by the
Extension Master Gardener volunteers in Buncombe County.

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NEWS - NC COOPERATIVE EXTENSION
BACKYARD COMPOST DEMONSTRATION 
Ask questions and learn!
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September 7
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10:00 am – 1:00 pm
WNC Farmers Market
Jesse Israel and Sons Nursery and Garden Center
 570 Brevard Rd
The Extension Master Gardener volunteers in Buncombe County maintain this demonstration area with four different composting methods on display. There is a single bin unit, a tumbling composter, a 3-bin method, and vermiculture.
The site is stocked with informational pamphlets on the how-to and why of composting. Come visit us to learn why and how to compost.
NEWS - NC COOPERATIVE EXTENSION
ask

INFO TABLE
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aaSeptember 14 and 28th
 8:00 AM – 12:00 PM
 
Asheville City Market on N. Market St., Asheville, NC 
Come to the Extension Master Gardener Info Table with your questions, get advice, explore trends and best ideas in gardening. Do you have plant and/or insect problems? Bring samples of plants and/or insects for identification and problem diagnosis. Pick up soil test kits and learn about upcoming Master Gardener programs.

NEWS - NC COOPERATIVE EXTENSION

PRESSURE GAUGE CHECK

NEWS - NC COOPERATIVE EXTENSION

To get your pressure gauge checked
call our office at 828-255-5522 to make arrangements or
ask questions about canning.
MASTER GARDENER BLOG!
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The Buncombe County Extension Master Gardener Volunteers

have a blog on a variety of topics including current insect and disease issues and gardening tips and activities for all ages and abilities.
CLICK HERE to sign up!

NEWS - NC COOPERATIVE EXTENSION

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NEWS - NC COOPERATIVE EXTENSION
NEED HELP WITH GARDEN QUESTIONS?

NEWS - NC COOPERATIVE EXTENSION

Extension Master Gardener Volunteers (EMGVs) are available to answer phones and provide assistance with your plant questions and problems Monday and Thursday 10:00 am – 2:00 pm.
Call 828-255-5522 or visit our office at 49 Mt. Carmel Rd.
Please bring samples large enough for plant identification.
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NEWS - NC COOPERATIVE EXTENSION
LEARN MORE ABOUT NC STATE EXTENSION >>
NEWS - NC COOPERATIVE EXTENSION
NEWS - NC COOPERATIVE EXTENSION
Contact:
Alison Arnold, Extension Agent, 
Consumer Horticulture
49 Mt. Carmel Rd., Asheville, NC 28806
828-255-5522
alison.arnold@ncsu.edu
NEWS - NC COOPERATIVE EXTENSION
NEWS - NC COOPERATIVE EXTENSION
NEWS - NC COOPERATIVE EXTENSION
NEWS - NC COOPERATIVE EXTENSION
NEWS - NC COOPERATIVE EXTENSION
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NC State University and N.C. A&T State University work in tandem, along with federal, state and local governments, to form a strategic partnership called N.C. Cooperative Extension.
NEWS - NC COOPERATIVE EXTENSION
NEWS - NC COOPERATIVE EXTENSION